Transcendence in Thanksgiving

Recently, I came across a definition of God suggested by the nineteenth century theologian, Adam Clarke. Of all things, it moved  me to  think about  Thanksgiving.

Many attempts have been made to define the term God.  As to the word itself, it is pure Anglo-Saxon, and among our ancestors signified, not only the divine Being, now commonly designated by the word, but also good; as in their apprehensions it appeared that God and good were correlative terms; and when they thought or spoke of him they were doubtless led from the word itself to consider him as THE GOOD BEING, a Fountain of infinite benevolence and beneficence toward his creatures.

A general definition of this great First Cause, as far as human words dare attempt one, may be thus given: The eternal, independent, and self-existent Being: the Being whose purposes and actions spring from himself, without foreign motive or influence: he who is absolute in dominion; the most pure, the most simple, and most spiritual of all essences; infinitely benevolent, beneficent, true, and holy: the cause of all being, the upholder of all things; infinitely happy, because infinitely perfect; and eternally self-sufficient, needing nothing that he has made; illimitable in his immensity, inconceivable in his mode of existence, and indescribable in his essence; known fully only to himself, because an infinite mind can be fully apprehended only by itself -- in a word, a Being who, from his infinite wisdom, can not err or be deceived; and who, from his infinite goodness, can do nothing but what is eternally just, right, and kind. [1]

I paused. And read again, and again, and was struck with an overwhelming feeling of gratitude. Through misty eyes and a full heart, I attempted to express appreciation for the GOOD Being, God.

Throughout recorded history, humankind has sought ways to give offerings of thanksgiving and gratitude to God, expressed in praise, song, dance and feast days. These expressions bind us in the reciprocity of gift and Giver. The biblical writings, church fathers, catechisms and prayers, as well as the upcoming national holiday, Thanksgiving, all recognize the essential role of remembering with gratitude. Such gratefulness is essential to life-giving relationship with God, our Creator, our Savior, our Sustainer in life everyday – the giver of every good and perfect gift.

Giving thanks to God has a transcendent aspect. It begins as an expression of what was experienced in  the earthly realm usually for a material, earthly good. Yet it should take on an effect, that transcends the gift to the Giver with a forgetfulness of self and a knowledge of God. And here lies the challenge for you and for me.

In our modern world, we are continually bombarded with messages of the sufficiency of the autonomous self. Marketers of modernity tell us that gifts and the identities of the gifted are acquired through  abilities, efforts, and wisdom, not at the hands of a Benevolent Benefactor. Thus, our “thank you” becomes a perfunctory courtesy, rather than a sign of true appreciation that increases humility and intimacy between creature and Creator.

If we are to sustain gratitude for every good and perfect gift from above, we must be reconciled to our experience of loss,  pain, and disparity. We embrace the Giver through the delightful gifts He gives, and we must learn to embrace Him through loss and pain. A recent reading of C.S. Lewis’ The Problem of Pain and Mere Christianity have furthered a realignment with these challenging ideas.

But there must be a real giving up of the self. You must throw it away "blindly" so to speak. Christ will indeed give you a real personality: but you must not go to Him for the sake of that. As long as your own personality is what you are bothering about you are not going to Him at all. The very first step is to try to forget about the self altogether. Your real, new self (which is Christ's and also yours, and yours just because it is His) will not come as long as you are looking for it. It will come when you are looking for Him. Does that sound strange? The same principle holds, you know, for more everyday matters. Even in social life, you will never make a good impression on other people until you stop thinking about what sort of impression you are making. Even in literature and art, no man who bothers about originality will ever be original: whereas if you simply try to tell the truth (without caring two pence how often it has been told before) you will, nine times out of ten, become original without ever having noticed it.

The principle runs through all life from top to bottom. Give up your self, and you will find your real self. Lose your life and you will save it. Submit to death, death of your ambitions and favourite wishes every day and death of your whole body in the end: submit with every fibre of your being, and you will find eternal life. Keep back nothing. Nothing that you have not given away will ever be really yours. Nothing in you that has not died will ever be raised from the dead. Look for yourself, and you will find in the long run only hatred, loneliness, despair, rage, ruin, and decay. But look for Christ and you will find Him, and with Him everything else thrown in.[2]

In looking for Christ, one will begin to experience what Adam Clarke attempted in his thirty plus descriptors of  God, the idea of  transcendent - beyond what is ordinary. We might begin with considering God in thanksgiving as “the eternal, independent, and self-existent Being: the Being whose purposes and actions spring from himself …


[1] Clarke, Adam, Christian Theology, 66-67.
[2] Lewis, C.S. Mere Christianity, 226-227.
* Nina Reznichenko, Prayer