"We Are Made By History"

The year our school opened, a parent of one of our eight enrolled students (yes, eight in total) came late to her January parent-teacher conference.  She apologized immediately and said with a smile that spanned the continent, “I just came from the parade!”

“Parade?” I asked.  Oblivious.

Though her mouth was still smiling, her eyes searched mine like I could not possibly be in earnest. “Dr. Martin Luther King!” she graciously reminded me.

Our school is situated in the heart of a southern town.  The scars and wounds of over 200 years of slavery followed by 100 more years of institutionalized racism, segregation, and oppression can still be seen.  Had I actually scheduled conferences on the holiday honoring Dr. King?  Why, yes, I had.  The look of obvious ignorance on my white face might have offended her, but if it did, she didn’t show it.  I have forgotten many things about that inaugural year, but I have never forgotten that exchange, how uncomfortable my ignorance was to me and, I fear, insulting to her.

I was not content to remain ignorant.  Even though I was born only 3 years after his death and raised in progressive southern California, all I knew besides his name and iconic initials, was that he was an African American civil rights activist who was assassinated.  Of course I knew assassination was a horrifying thing, but growing up did I even conceptualize the term “civil rights”?  I doubt it.  Of this great man it was not difficult to inform my ignorance; in doing so I was deeply moved, and I wanted to make sure all students in our school would have the opportunity to know and appreciate Dr. King’s service and courage.  Not in a cursory way, but in the same rich way our students honor the sacrifice and service of military veterans or the creative genius of Shakespeare.

One of the things I have always appreciated about Ambleside® regarding school programs, is the limitation of key annual events to just three:  Veterans Day chapel, Christmas chapel, and the Shakespeare festival.  Three years after opening, our school committed to including a fourth annual program: The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. chapel, which is held the third week in January, close to the U.S. national holiday that honors him. Upon returning from Christmas break, students begin hearing about Dr. King’s early life during morning assembly. African American spirituals and songs of the civil rights movement like, “We Shall Overcome” and “I Shall Not Be Moved” are taught in music class. Relevant poetry, readings, and recitations are shared.  When the special day arrives, we gather in the parish hall, and our speaker is none other than Dr. King himself.   His dream or his view form the mountaintop is projected in fuzzy black and white images on a massive screen.  His recorded voice booms out, like a siren, both warning and warming our hearts.  Next week will mark the 8th annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Chapel held at Ambleside School of Ocala.

Service is another knightly quality which a child should be nerved for by heroic examples until he grudges to let slip an opportunity… Courage, too, should be something more than the impulse of the moment;it is a natural fire to be fed by heroic example and by the teaching that the thing to be done is always of more consequence than the doer.”[1]

In Dr. King we have just such a heroic example.  He courageously shared the truth of human persons that the rest of the world, certainly many in the United States of America, had a hard time seeing.   His service helped the world gain access to the truth, not by force, but by inspiration, grace, suffering and sacrifice.

My daughter, a high school junior, has often repeated the line: “You begin to die the day you stay silent about things that matter.”  Dr. King said that, and I’m proud to say she became interested in and acquainted with him during her formative years in an Ambleside® School.


[1] Mason, Charlotte, School Education, 111.